Skip to content

Boiling Hardware

Boiling Hardware published on 11 Comments on Boiling Hardware

 3698644237_02dda81233.jpg

Finally got around to stripping the 10 layers of paint off of those lovely Victorian hinges I purchased at Vaccaro’s Salvage.

3625938766_508ef3699c.jpg

3698643709_f09f8b96d4.jpg

The easiest, cheapest way to strip hardware is to boil it. I add some baking soda and simmer it for 30-60 minutes. Some folks cook it in a crock pot overnight with a bit of laundry detergent. Hardware. It’s what’s for dinner.

3698642423_4877f52c2d.jpg

Once it’s soaked, the bulk of the paint will come off with no effort. You’ll have some cleaning up to do in crevices. Have a wire brush handy to scrub more paint off.

A few tips:

1. No, you don’t use a pot you use to cook.

2. Have tongs handy. That sh*t gets hot!

3. Ditto on gloves.

4. You’ll need some stripping tools for the pot action, then…

5. For clean up: chemical stripper, mask, chemical gloves, small pointy tool for teeny detail areas, wire brush or steel wool.

6. Clean up well. Chances are it is lead paint.

7. Soak in soapy water, then vinegar (scrub) to make it shine like new!

3698641475_9f7ecd6b8f.jpg

Categories

11 Comments

[…] I have to thank Reclaimed Home for helping me restore the vintage light switch in my new apartment. It was caked with multiple layers of paint. I boiled it for about twenty minutes in water and baking soda. Paint slid right off and I didn’t have to use carcinogenic stripper with a gas mask. Here are the directions from Reclaimed Home: Boiling Hardware. […]

[…] I have to thank Reclaimed Home for helping me restore the vintage light switch in my new apartment. It was caked with multiple layers of paint. I boiled it for about twenty minutes in water and baking soda. Paint slid right off and I didn’t have to use carcinogenic stripper with a gas mask. Here are the directions from Reclaimed Home: Boiling Hardware. […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Primary Sidebar